Campbell systematic reviews featured at APPAM, 8-10 November, Washington DC

Super Session: Systematic Reviews: The Next Step in Evidence-Based Policy Analysis?

(Politics, Media, and the Policy Process)
Thursday, November 8, 2018: 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
Lincoln 4 - Exhibit Level (Marriott Wardman Park)

Moderators:  Douglas Besharov, University of Maryland, College Park

Speakers:  Howard White, Campbell Collaboration, Rebecca Maynard, University of Pennsylvania, T'Pring Westbrook, Annie E. Casey Foundation and Jon Baron, Laura and John Arnold Foundation

As evidence-based approaches gain broader application, many ask whether there is a need for more scientifically nuanced approaches to policy making and funding decisions, and whether a re-tooled and streamlined version of systematic research reviews might provide a useful framework. A panel with broad experience conducting and using systematic reviews in evidence-based environments will discuss this question.

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Roundtable: Making Research Responsive to Policymakers' Needs: A Roundtable Discussion about Systematic Reviews and Other Approaches to Evidence Synthesis

(Methods and Tools of Analysis)
Saturday, November 10, 2018: 1:30 PM-3:00 PM
Wilson C - Mezz Level (Marriott Wardman Park)

Moderators:  Michael E Gluck, AcademyHealth

Speakers:  Naomi Goldstein, Administration for Children and Families, Arlene Bierman, U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Mike Wilson, McMaster University and Howard White, Campbell Collaboration

Systematic reviews have become an important research translation tool for the policymaking process, fueled in part by efforts like the Cochrane and Campbell Collaborations. However, concern that strictly adhering to the methods that assure the rigor and credibility of systematic reviews limits their timeliness, efficiency, and responsiveness to users’ needs have led knowledge brokers to explore new approaches to conducting evidence reviews for policymakers.

The moderator will lead a discussion that focuses on (1) the role of research and research synthesis in informing policy; (2) challenges for policymakers seeking to understand bodies of research evidence; (3) the reasons for potential disconnects between policymaker needs and academic approaches to research synthesis; (4) practical tools for and examples of balancing methodological rigor with timeliness and responsiveness.

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