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Search Result: 64 Records found
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Advocacy interventions to reduce or eliminate violence and promote the physical and psychosocial well-being of women who experience intimate partner abuse
  • Authors Carol Rivas, Jean Ramsay, Laura Sadowski, Leslie Davidson, Danielle Dunne, Sandra Eldridge, Kelsey Hegarty, Angela Taft, Gene Feder
  • Published date 2016-01-04
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Title Advocacy interventions to reduce or eliminate violence and promote the physical and psychosocial well-being of women who experience intimate partner abuse
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2016.2
  • Records available in English, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    Limited evidence and limited effects of advocacy to reduce intimate partner violence

    Intensive advocacy may improve everyday life for women in domestic violence shelters and refuges, and reduce physical abuse. There is no clear evidence that intensive advocacy reduces sexual, emotional, or overall abuse, or that it benefits women’s mental health. It is unclear whether brief advocacy is effective.

    What is the review about?

    Partner abuse or domestic violence includes physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; threats; withholding money; causing injury; and long lasting physical and emotional health problems. Active support by trained people, which is called ‘advocacy’, may help women make safety plans, deal with abuse, and access community resources.

    Advocacy may be a stand-alone service, accepting referrals from healthcare providers, or part of a multi-component, and possibly multi-agency, intervention. It may take place in the community, a shelter, or as part of antenatal or other healthcare, and vary in intensity from less than an hour to 80 hours.

    Advocacy may contribute to reducing abuse, empowering women to improve their situation by providing informal counselling and support for safety planning and increasing access to different services.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This Campbell systematic review assesses the effects of advocacy interventions on intimate partner violence and women’s wellbeing. The review summarizes findings from 13 studies.

    What were the main findings of the review?

    What studies are included?

    This review summarizes evidence from 13 clinical trials comparing advocacy for 1,241 abused women with no care or usual care. Most studies followed up on the women for at least a year.

    Does advocacy reduce intimate partner violence and improve women’s wellbeing?

    Physical abuse: After one year, brief advocacy had no effect in two healthcare studies and one community study, but it reduced minor abuse in one antenatal care study. Another antenatal study showed reduced abuse immediately after brief advocacy, but women were also treated for depression, which may have affected results. Two studies provided weak evidence that intensive advocacy reduces physical abuse up to two years after the intervention.

    Sexual abuse was reported in four studies, which found no effects.

    Emotional abuse: One antenatal care study reported reduced emotional abuse at 12 months after advocacy.

    Depression: Brief advocacy prevented depression in abused women attending healthcare services and pregnant women immediately after advocacy. Intensive advocacy did not reduce depression in shelter women followed up at 12 and 24 months. The moderate-to-low quality evidence came mostly from studies with a low risk of bias.

    Quality of life: Three trials of brief advocacy trials no benefit on quality of life. Intensive advocacy showed a weak benefit in two studies in domestic violence shelters and refuges, and a primary care study showed improved motivation to do daily tasks immediately after advocacy.

    What do the results mean?

    Intensive advocacy may improve everyday life for women in domestic violence shelters and refuges in the short term, and reduce physical abuse one to two years after the intervention. There is no clear evidence that intensive advocacy reduces sexual, emotional, or overall abuse, or that it benefits women’s mental health. It is unclear whether brief advocacy is effective, although it may provide short-term mental health benefits and reduce abuse, particularly in pregnant women and those suffering less severe abuse.

    Several studies summarised in this review are potentially biased because of weak study designs. There was little consistency between studies, with variations for advocacy given, the type of benefits measured, and the lengths of follow-up periods, making it hard to combine their results. So it is not possible to be certain how much or which type of advocacy interventions benefit women.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The search for this review was updated in April 2015.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

Functional family therapy (FFT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use
  • Authors Trine Filges, Ditte Andersen, Anne-Marie Klint Jørgensen
  • Published date 2015-09-01
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Title Functional family therapy (FFT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.14
  • Records available in English, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    Little evidence on the effectiveness of FFT as a treatment for non-opioid drug use for young people

    Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is used as a treatment for young peoples’ use of cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy, or cocaine. There is very little evidence of its effectiveness, so it should be used with caution and subject to further evaluation.

    What did the review study?

    Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short-term, manual-based, intervention. It is delivered in outpatient settings and aims to modify interactions between family members to improve youth behavior. This review assesses the effectiveness of FFT as a treatment for young peoples’ use of cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy, or cocaine.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This Campbell systematic review assesses the effectiveness of FFT to reduce drug abuse (cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy, or cocaine) among young people aged 11 to 21 years. The review includes two randomised controlled trials, but summarises findings from only one study reporting on the outcome of drug use.

    What studies are included?

    The review includes controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of FFT to reduce drug abuse among young people aged 11 to 21 years. Studies included in the review compare the effects of FFT on non-opioid drug use with no intervention, a waitlist condition or with alternative treatments.

    Two studies, reported in three papers, are included. Both were conducted in the U.S. Only one provides outcomes related to youth drug use. It compares the effectiveness of FFT with that of alternative treatments.

    What are the main results in this review?

    The results from the one study reporting on the effect of FFT on youth drug use shows a short-term (four month) reduction in the use of cannabis, an effect that disappears in the longer term.

    What do the findings in this review mean?

    There is a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of FFT for the treatment of non-opioid drug use in young people. It is impossible to draw conclusions and as such, FFT should be used with caution when targeting youth drug use. Agencies supporting FFT should build studies of effectiveness into their programmes.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The review authors searched for studies published until July 2013.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

The impact of detention on the health of asylum seekers
  • Authors Trine Filges, Edith Montgomery, Marianne Kastrup, Anne-Marie Klint Jørgensen
  • Published date 2015-09-01
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Title The impact of detention on the health of asylum seekers
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.13
  • Records available in English, Norwegian, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    Detention of asylum seekers has adverse effects on mental health

    Confining asylum seekers in detention centres negatively affects their mental health both during their detention and after their release.

    What did the review study?

    The number of people fleeing conflicts and persecution is increasing. However, many countries use harsh measures to discourage people who wish to apply for asylum. One of the most controversial is confining asylum seekers in detention centres. The number of such centres is rising.

    Understanding the health impact of detaining asylum seekers is important. Asylum seekers have high rates of pre-migration trauma from exposure to war, genocide or imprisonment. These experiences make them vulnerable to health problems. Confining them may worsen the effects of the trauma they have experienced already.

    This Campbell systematic review assessed whether detaining asylum seekers has an impact on their mental health. The review also assessed whether detaining asylum seekers has a negative impact on their physical health and social functioning.

    About this review

    This Campbell systematic review examines the impacts of on health, including mental health (PTSD, anxiety and depression), physical health and social functioning, of confining asylum seekers in detention centres. The review includes nine studies from the UK, Japan, Canada, and Australia.

    What studies were included?

    Included studies compared asylum seekers who were detained with those who were not detained. A total of nine studies met the requirements for inclusion, which analysed 8 different asylum populations. The studies were conducted in four countries: the UK, Japan, Canada, and Australia. All the studies used non-randomised designs.

    Six of the studies were excluded from the analysis because there were important differences between the groups which were compared, or because the studies were judged to have methodological limitations. All of the excluded studies were conducted in Australia, which has a policy of mandatory detention.

    How does detention affect mental health?

    Detention has a negative impact on the mental health of asylum seekers. Levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety both before and after release were found to be higher among asylum seekers who were detained compared to those who were not detained. The size of the effects were clinically important.

    All the studies assessed the mental health of the participants but none reported outcomes related to physical or social functioning.

    What are the research and policy implications of this review?

    Implications for policy- and decision-makers

    Policymakers should consider less harmful policy options than detention. These options may include reporting requirements, sureties or bail, or community supervision. Options that restrict people’s freedom of movement should also be closely monitored to ensure that these do not also have negative mental health effects.

    Research implications

    The research summarized in the review is of moderate quality. Further research is needed to assess the impacts of keeping asylum seekers in detention centres on their physical health and social functioning. A deeper, comparative understanding of the impacts of different detention conditions on asylum seekers is also needed.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The review authors searched for studies between November 2013 and January 2014.

  • Norwegian

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Norwegian.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

School-based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse
  • Authors Kerryann Walsh, Karen Zwi, Sue Woolfenden, Aron Shlonsky
  • Published date 2015-05-04
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Title School-based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.10
  • Records available in English, Hindi, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    School-based sexual abuse prevention programmes strengthen children’s protective behaviours and increase knowledge about sexual abuse

    School based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse – in the short term – can increase elementary students’ knowledge of sexual abuse and behaviours protecting them against this type of abuse.

    What did the review study?

    Child sexual abuse is a significant global problem in both magnitude and its consequences. The most widely used primary prevention strategy has been the provision of school-based education programmes. Although programmes have been taught in schools since the 1980s, their effectiveness requires ongoing scrutiny.

    This review assesses whether: programmes are effective in improving students’ protective behaviours and knowledge about sexual abuse prevention; behaviours and skills are retained over time; and participation results in disclosures of sexual abuse, produces harms, or both.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This Campbell systematic review examines the effectiveness of school-based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse. The review summarises findings from 24 trials, conducted in the USA, Canada, China, Germany, Taiwan and Turkey. Six meta-analyses are included assessing evidence of moderate quality. This study is an update to a previous review and covers publications up to September 2014.

    Which studies are included in this review?

    Only controlled studies - randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi RCTs – were included. Studies compared the school-based education programme with the standard school curriculum or no intervention.

    What are the main results in this review?

    Do school-based education programmes strengthen children’s protective behaviours and knowledge about sexual abuse?

    School-based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse are more effective than alternative programmes or no programme at all in strengthening children’s knowledge about child sexual abuse prevention and their protective behaviours. Children retain the knowledge gained from programme participation, though no study has assessed retention over a period of longer than six months. No studies examined the retention of protective behaviours over time.

    Disclosures of previous and current occurrences of child sexual abuse increase for participants of school-based education programmes. However, the evidence supporting this finding is weak and should be interpreted with caution.

    Are there any adverse effects from school-based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse?

    School-based education programmes do not cause fear or anxiety among child participants. Parental anxiety or fear was not measured in any of the studies.

    What was the quality of the evidence?

    The quality of the evidence of studies included in this review is moderate due to risk of bias detected for several studies, imprecise data reporting and – for studies using a cluster-randomised design – insufficient data reported for accurate analysis.

    What do the findings in this review mean?

    School-based education programmes for the prevention of child sexual abuse are a valid approach to strengthen the knowledge about child sexual abuse, and the protective behaviours of children in primary schools. The review did not assess whether these programs actually prevent child sexual abuse.

    Further research is needed to more rigorously evaluate existing programmes, their content, methods, and delivery, including the use of web-based or online programmes. This research should also explore the potential relation between program participation and actual prevention of child sexual abuse.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The review authors searched for studies published until September 2014.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

  • Hindi

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Hindi.

Food supplementation for improving the physical and psychosocial health of socio-economically disadvantaged children aged three months to five years
  • Authors Elizabeth Kristjansson, Damian K Francis, Selma Liberato, Maria Benkhalti Jandu, Vivian Andrea Welch, Malek Batal, Trisha Greenhalgh, Tamara Rader, Eamonn Noonan, Beverley J. Shea, Laura Janzen, George A. Wells, Mark Petticrew
  • Published date 2015-05-04
  • Coordinating group(s) International Development, Nutrition, Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Title Food supplementation for improving the physical and psychosocial health of socio-economically disadvantaged children aged three months to five years
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.11
  • Records available in English, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    Food supplementation is more effective if better targeted and supervised

    Supplementary food has a small effect on nutritional outcomes. It is more effective for younger and poorer children, when provided in day-care or feeding centres than as take home rations, when the supplemental food provides higher energy and when there is stricter program supervision. There is a positive effect on psychomotor development, but no clear evidence of an effect on cognitive development.

    What did the review study?

    Undernutrition is a severe problem, especially low and middle-income countries, where it contributes to the death of a million children each year. It also increases the risks of lowered cognitive functioning, poor school performance and poor health. Supplementary feeding programs aim to close the energy gap from poor nutrition. They provide additional food or beverages with a high energy level to be consumed alongside regular meals.

    This review examines whether food supplementation is effective in improving the health of disadvantaged children aged 3 months to 5 years, and examines the factors that contribute to the effectiveness of food supplementation programs.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This Campbell systematic review examines whether food supplementation is effective in improving the health of disadvantaged children under 5. The review summarizes findings from 32 studies: 21 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and 11 controlled before-and-after studies (CBAs).

    What studies are included?

    Studies included in this review compare the effects of supplementary food on children’s physical and psychosocial health to no-feeding or a placebo. Feeding programs could be implemented through day-care, feeding centres, or in the home, though those in a hospital setting were excluded.

    The review includes 32 studies, 21 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and 11 controlled before-and-after studies (CBAs). The majority of the included studies (29) are conducted in low- and middle-income countries.

    What were the main findings of the review?

    Is supplementary food effective in improving the health of disadvantaged children under five?

    Supplementary feeding for young, disadvantaged children has small effects on children’s weight and growth in low- and middle-income countries. Children who are younger, and poorer or more undernourished grow more in response to supplementary feeding.

    More leakage occurs from take home rations. Therefore, food supplementation programs implemented through day care centres seem to be more effective, as are those with stricter supervision.

    Both single and multiple interventions were effective for weight gain in children but the effect size for multiple interventions was higher. The effect is also higher for higher energy meals.

    There is a positive effect on psychomotor development, which is development of skills that require both mental and muscular activity (such as crawling, walking, talking). However, there was no clear evidence of an effect on cognitive development.

    What do the findings in this review mean?

    Targeting and strict supervision may increase the effectiveness of food supplementation programs.

    The supplement should contain at least 30 per cent of the recommended daily intake. Consideration should also be given to providing rations for other family members to avoid leakage.

    There is a need to fund additional trials to examine the impact of supplementary feeding on the psychosocial development of young, disadvantaged children. More research is also needed on the implementation of high-quality interventions and large-scale programmes for supplementary feeding.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The review authors searched for studies until January 2014.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

Parent-infant psychotherapy for improving parental and infant mental health
  • Authors Jane Barlow, Cathy Bennett, Nick Midgley, Soili Larkin, Yinghui Wei
  • Published date 2015-03-02
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Title Parent-infant psychotherapy for improving parental and infant mental health
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.6
  • Records available in English, Norwegian, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    Parent-infant psychotherapy for high-risk mothers may be better than no treatment, but no better than alternative treatments

    Parent-infant Psychotherapy (PIP) for parents experiencing adversity, may improve the attachment of infants compared to no treatment, but there is no evidence that PIP has an impact on any other outcomes (e.g. parental mental health). PIP does not appear to be more effective than alternative treatments in improving maternal or infant mental health.

    What did the review study?

    Parent-infant psychotherapy (PIP) aims to address infant problems such as emotional, behavioural, eating and sleeping disorders. It also aims to address problems in the parents’ relationship with an infant, such as bonding difficulties or low sensitivity. It targets the relationship between the infant and his or her parent, and psychotherapists using this psychodynamic approach deliver it jointly to both the parent and the infant, typically in weekly meetings over the course of five to twenty weeks.

    This review examines if using PIP with mothers experiencing adversity is effective in improving maternal and infant mental health and the mother-infant relationship. The review also assesses the effectiveness of PIP for a mother’s ability to care for her baby, and for infant stress and development.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This Campbell systematic review compares the effectiveness of Parent-Infant Psychotherapy (PIP) in improving the mental health of parents, the parent-infant relationship and infant emotional wellbeing with that of no treatment, treatment as usual and alternative treatments. The review summarises findings from eight randomised controlled trials (RCTs), with a total of 846 participants.

    What studies are included?

    The studies included in this review compare the effects of PIP programmes with a control group that received no treatment, treatment-as-usual, or an alternative treatment, such as interaction guidance, psychoeducation, counselling or cognitive behavioural therapy.

    Eight randomised controlled trials studies are included, with a total of 846 parents with infants aged up to 2 years. Four studies compare PIP to no treatment or treatment-as-usual, and four to alternative treatments. Three of these studies were conducted in the USA, and one each in Canada, Switzerland and Sweden.The included studies were based on samples that included mothers only, all of whom experienced mental health problems, domestic abuse or substance dependency, and some of whom were also in prison.

    Is PIP effective for high-risk populations?

    Compared with no treatment or treatment-as-usual, PIP participants show an increase in the number of infants securely attached; fewer infants with an avoidant or disorganised attachment style; and more infants moving from insecure to secure attachment. This was maintained at follow up.

    PIP is neither more nor less effective than no treatment or treatment-as-usual in improving maternal mental health, and reflective functioning; infant stress and development; or the quality of the mother-infant interaction.

    Does PIP have any adverse effects?

    Few adverse effects were identified in the included studies. One study showed that infants whose mothers received PIP stayed in the same attachment category or showed a less secure attachment.

    What was the quality of the evidence?

    The quality of the evidence of studies included in this review is weak. Only a few studies were included and these were based on small sample sizes, and several methodological biases were detected. Results, should therefore, be interpreted with caution.

    What do the findings in this review mean?

    PIP is a potentially effective method of improving the attachment status of infants of mothers experiencing adversity, but there is no evidence to support its use to improve other aspects of the relationship or parental functioning, nor to support the use of PIP over other treatment approaches. This evidence should be treated with caution due to methodological problems.

    Further high-quality and rigorous research is needed to assess the effectiveness of PIP compared with other models, such as interaction guidance. Further research is also needed to establish the impact of PIP on other potentially important outcomes such as parental mental health and reflective functioning.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The review authors searched for studies published until January 2014.

  • Norwegian

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Norwegian.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

Multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use
  • Authors Trine Filges, Pernille Skovbo Rasmussen, Ditte Andersen, Anne-Marie Klint Jorgensen
  • Published date 2015-03-02
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review
  • Title Multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.8
Family behavior therapy (FBT) for young people in treatment for illicit non-opioid drug use
  • Authors Maia Lindstrøm, Madina Saidj, Krystyna Kowalski, Trine Filges, Pernille Skovbo Rasmussen, Anne-Marie Klint Jørgensen
  • Published date 2015-03-02
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review
  • Title Family behavior therapy (FBT) for young people in treatment for illicit non-opioid drug use
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.9
Effect of interventions to facilitate communication between families or single young people with minority language background and public services
  • Authors Sabine Wollscheid, Heather Menzies Munthe-Kaas, Karianne Thune Hammerstrøm, Eamonn Noonan
  • Published date 2015-03-02
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review Plain language summary
  • Title Effect of interventions to facilitate communication between families or single young people with minority language background and public services
  • Library Image Library Image
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.7
  • Records available in English, Spanish
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    Improving communication between public services and minority language speakers

    No particular approach to interpretation (in-person, telephone, bilingual staff or ad hoc) works better than others to improve the quality of communication and patient satisfaction for people with a minority language background that use public services. An enhanced English as a Second Language (ESL) class did increase parents’ involvement in children’s schoolwork, and their English skills improved more than with a regular ESL course.

    What is this review about?

    As a result of increased immigration, many people having a minority language background use public services. In principle, all people should have access to services, and equal access is sometimes required by law.

    Well-functioning communication is important for effective help from public services. Mis-communication can lead to wrong decisions and poor results. Services may need to be able to provide communication tailored to people with limited skills in the main languages spoken in the country they are residing in.

    The review includes studies in the United States, of aids used to improve communication between immigrant children, youth or families with a minority language background, and public services such as child welfare or health services.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This systematic review examines whether aids for communication are effective between public services and children and youth, or families with an immigrant background. The researchers analyse relevant studies, and the team included four comparative studies, three for health services and one for education.

    What are the main results in this review?

    Which communication aids are included?

    Communication aids fall into three categories: (a) those to help verbal or direct communication such as different types of interpretation services; (b) those to help written communication, such as translation of case documents or information materials; and (c) broader aids to improve communication between service providers and service users. This category includes, for instance, second language training for parents in order to improve their ability to communicate with their child’s school.

    How effective are communication aids used?

    Three studies conducted within health services compare the effect of different types of interpretation service or of using bilingual personnel.

    There is no clear indication that any particular approach to interpretation works better than others. None of in-person, telephone, bilingual staff or ad hoc interpreting could demonstrate a clear advantage over other approaches. There is uncertainty about the reliability of this finding because the studies had limitations, including small scale.

    One study of the effect of two different training programmes of ESL suggests that:

    • An enhanced ESL class (where the course was tailored to immigrant parents) improved parents’ involvement in students’ schoolwork and parents’ English skills more than a regular ESL course.
    • There is uncertainty about the reliability of this finding because the study had important limitations, including small scale. Similar studies of more robust design are needed in order to draw firm conclusions.

    What do the findings of this review mean?

    There is in most cases no significant difference in communication quality and patient satisfaction between different means of aiding communication between people having a minority language background and public services workers. One study suggests that an ESL course integrating parent involvement knowledge with behaviour was more effective than standard ESL.

    There is a need for additional studies of communication aids used between this population and public services, particularly for services outside health care, such as child welfare, school and early childcare, work and welfare services, and prison and probation services.

    How up-to-date is this review?

    The review authors searched for studies published up to January 2013.

  • Spanish

    Click on 'Download PDF' on the right to view the plain language summary in Spanish.

Active labour market programme (ALMP) participation for unemployment insurance recipients
  • Authors Trine Filges, Geir Smedslund, Anne-Sofie Due Knudsen, Anne-Marie Klint Jorgensen
  • Published date 2015-01-02
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Review
  • Title Active labour market programme (ALMP) participation for unemployment insurance recipients
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2015.2
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