Better evidence for a better world
Better evidence for a better world

Better evidence for a better world (167)

Additional Info

  • Authors Carlos Oya, Florian Schaefer, Dafni Skalidou, Catherine McCosker, Laurenz Langer
  • Published date 2017-03-01
  • Coordinating group(s) International Development
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • PLS Title Certification schemes do not seem to improve household incomes for farmers and wages for workers
  • PLS Description This review assesses whether certification schemes work for the wellbeing of agricultural producers and workers in low- and middle- income countries.
  • Title Effects of certification schemes for agricultural production on socio-economic outcomes in low- and middle-income countries
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2017.3

Additional Info

  • Authors Martin Bøg, Trine Filges, Lars Brännström, Anne-Marie Klint Jørgensen, Maja Karrman Fredriksson
  • Published date 2017-02-15
  • Coordinating group(s) Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary Data
  • PLS Title 12-step programs for reducing illicit drug use are neither better nor worse than other interventions
  • PLS Description This review examines the effectiveness of 12-step programs in reducing the use of illicit drugs. Secondary outcomes considered are on criminal behaviour, prostitution, psychiatric symptoms, social functioning, employment status, homelessness, and treatment retention.
  • Title 12-step programs for reducing illicit drug use
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2017.2

Additional Info

  • Authors Emily A. Hennessy, Emily E. Tanner-Smith, Andrew J. Finch, Nila Sathe, Shannon Kugley
  • Published date 2018-10-04
  • Coordinating group(s) Education, Social Welfare
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • Category Image Category Image
  • PLS Title There is insufficient evidence to know whether recovery high schools and collegiate recovery communities are effective
  • PLS Description Based on the results of one study, recovery high schools (RHSs) may reduce high school students’ school absenteeism, marijuana use, and other drug use, and increase abstinence from drugs; but RHSs may be no better or worse than other high schools in improving grades, reducing truancy, or reducing alcohol use. It is unclear whether collegiate recovery communities (CRCs) are effective in promoting academic success and reducing substance use among college students.
  • Title Recovery schools for improving behavioral and academic outcomes among students in recovery from substance use disorders
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2018.9

Additional Info

  • Authors Matthew Manning, Susanne Garvis, Christopher Fleming, Gabriel T. W. Wong
  • Published date 2017-01-20
  • Coordinating group(s) Education
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • Category Image Category Image
  • PLS Title Higher teacher qualifications are associated with higher quality early childhood education and care
  • PLS Description This review examines the empirical evidence on the relationship between teacher qualifications and the quality of the early childhood learning environment. Higher teacher qualifications are positively associated with higher quality in early childhood education and care.
  • Title The relationship between teacher qualification and the quality of the early childhood care and learning environment

Additional Info

  • Authors Marjorie Chinen, Thomas de Hoop, Lorena Alcázar, María Balarin, Josh Sennett
  • Published date 2017-12-21
  • Coordinating group(s) International Development
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • PLS Title Vocational and business training benefit women on the labour market, but the effects of most programmes are small
  • PLS Description Women around the world often perform jobs with minimal skill requirements, and encounter few opportunities for learning and advancement. Governments and development agencies try to improve women’s skills through vocational and business training programmes. This review summarises evidence on the impacts of such programmes, and on the barriers to and facilitators of vocational and business training effectiveness.
  • Title Vocational and business training to improve women’s labour market outcomes in low- and middle-income countries
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2017.16

Additional Info

  • Authors Roy Carr-Hill, Caine Rolleston, Rebecca Schendel
  • Published date 2016-12-07
  • Coordinating group(s) International Development
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • Category Image Category Image
  • PLS Title School-based decision-making has positive effects on education outcomes but less so in low-income countries
  • PLS Description Decentralizing decision-making to schools has mainly small to moderate positive effects in reducing repetition, dropouts and increasing test scores. These effects are restricted to middle-income countries, with fewer and smaller positive effects found in low-income countries or in disadvantaged communities.
  • Title The effects of school-based decision-making on educational outcomes in low- and middle-income contexts
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2016.9

Additional Info

  • Authors Jennifer Petkovic, Vivian Welch, Marie Helena Jacob, Manosila Yoganathan, Ana Patricia Ayala, Heather Cunningham, Peter Tugwell
  • Published date 2018-09-10
  • Coordinating group(s) Knowledge Translation and Implementation
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • PLS Title Policy briefs make systematic reviews easier to understand but little evidence of impact on use of study findings
  • PLS Description Systematic reviews are long and technical documents that may be hard for policymakers to use when making decisions. Evidence summaries are short documents that describe research findings in systematic reviews. These summaries may simplify the use of systematic reviews. Other names for evidence reviews are policy briefs, evidence briefs, summaries of findings, or plain language summaries. The goal of this review was to learn whether evidence summaries help policymakers use evidence from systematic reviews. This review also aimed to identify the best ways to present the evidence summary to increase the use of evidence.
  • Title Do evidence summaries increase health policy-makers’ use of evidence from systematic reviews?
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2018.8

Additional Info

  • Authors Ezequiel Molina, Laura Carella, Ana Pacheco, Guillermo Cruces, Leonardo Gasparini
  • Published date 2016-11-15
  • Coordinating group(s) International Development
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • Category Image Category Image
  • PLS Title Community monitoring interventions can reduce corruption and may improve services
  • PLS Description This Campbell systematic review assesses the effectiveness of Community Monitoring Interventions in reducing corruption. The review summarises findings from 15 studies, of which seven are from Asia, six from Africa and two from Latin America.
  • Title Community monitoring interventions to curb corruption and increase access and quality of service delivery in low- and middle-income countries
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2016.8

Additional Info

  • Authors Brandy R. Maynard, Anne Farina, Nathaniel A. Dell, Michael S. Kelly
  • Published date 2019-07-17
  • Coordinating group(s) Education
  • Type of document Review
  • Title Effects of trauma-informed approaches in schools
  • English

    PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY

    The review in brief

    Despite growing support and increased rate of which trauma‐informed approaches are being promoted and implemented in schools, evidence to support this approach is lacking.

    What is this review about?

    Exposure to different types of trauma have been associated with varying types and complexity of adverse outcomes, including adverse effects on cognitive functioning, attention, memory, academic performance, and school‐related behaviors. Given the growing research on trauma and increased knowledge about the prevalence, consequences and costs associated with trauma, there have been increased efforts at the local, state and federal levels to make systems “trauma‐informed” (Lang, Campbell, & Vanerploeg, 2015). While the intent of creating trauma‐informed approaches in schools is a noble one, relatively little is known about the benefits, costs, and how trauma‐informed approaches are being defined and evaluated (Berliner & Kolko, 2016). Adopting a trauma‐informed approach in a complex system such as a school building or district is a time consuming and potentially costly endeavor and thus it is important to assess the effects of this approach to inform policy and practice.

    This aim of this review was to assess trauma‐informed approaches in schools on trauma symptoms/mental health, academic performance, behavior, and socioemotional functioning. Trauma‐informed approaches include programs, organizations, or systems that realize the impact of trauma, recognize the symptoms of trauma, respond by integrating knowledge about trauma policies and practices, and seeks to reduce retraumatization. At least two of the three key elements of a trauma‐informed approach must have been present: Workforce development, trauma‐focused services, and organizational environment and practices, which differ from trauma‐specific interventions designed to treat or otherwise address the impact/symptoms of trauma and facilitate healing.

    What is the aim of this review?

    This Campbell systematic review sought to examine the effects trauma‐informed schools on trauma symptoms/mental health, academic performance, behavior, and socioemotional functioning. Although we conducted a comprehensive search to find studies testing trauma‐informed approaches in schools, no studies met the inclusion criteria.

    What are the main findings of this review?

    No studies met criteria for this review, indicating that there is a lack of evidence of trauma‐informed approaches in schools.

    What do the findings of this review mean?

    Despite widespread support and growing adoption of trauma‐informed approaches in schools across the globe, we found no studies to provide good evidence to suggest that this approach is effective in achieving the stated goals. Given the degree to which trauma‐informed approaches are being adopted in schools across the US and other countries, it is important that the effects of these programs be assessed.

    How up‐to‐date is this review?

    The review authors searched for studies June through September, 2017.

  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cl2.1018

Additional Info

  • Authors Vivian Andrea Welch, Shally Awasthi, Chisa Cumberbatch, Robert Fletcher, Jessie McGowan, Katelyn Merritt, Shari Krishnaratne, Salim Sohani, Peter Tugwell, Howard White, George A. Wells
  • Published date 2016-09-27
  • Coordinating group(s) International Development
  • Type of document Title Protocol Review Plain language summary
  • Category Image Category Image
  • PLS Title Mass deworming programmes have little or no effect on most welfare outcomes
  • PLS Description The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of mass deworming of children to improve child health and other outcomes is debated. This independent analysis reinforces the case against mass deworming, finding little or no effect on most welfare outcomes.
  • Title Deworming and adjuvant interventions for improving the developmental health and well-being of children in low- and middle-income countries
  • See the full review https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.4073/csr.2016.7
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